At just 22 years old, Dina Levačić has made waves in the world of open water swimming,
achieving a Triple Crown within 90 days and completing numerous successful swimathons.
As a dedicated student of Rehabilitation and a passionate humanitarian, Dina is the perfect
guide to share her tips on overcoming initial challenges in the open water swimming.

1. EMBRACE THE WATER: SWIM, SWIM, AND SWIM SOME MORE

Training extensively through swimming is crucial when preparing for open water swims. The
distance covered during training will depend on the specific event you are targeting. Setting fitness goals and monitoring your progress, similar to running, is essential. Unlike on land, where you can take a break or sit down when tired, open-water swimming demands continuous effort. Understanding your own endurance capacity is vital for success.

2. CONQUER DEEP WATERS AND DARKNESS

The fear of deep water and darkness can deter many individuals from attempting open-water swimming. Ideally, one should start swimming in deep waters during childhood when fear is less prevalent. However, for most people, this option is no longer available. In such cases, it is advisable to begin swimming in deeper areas that you are already familiar with and consider safe. By doing so, you can gradually relax and overcome any apprehensions.

3. WORK IN HARMONY WITH NATURE, NOT AGAINST IT

Mastering waves poses a significant challenge in open-water swimming. Many swimmers
exhaust themselves by battling against waves, leading to numerous difficulties during their
swim. To become adept at navigating waves, practice in both pool settings and real-life, conditions where waves occur. Often, swimmers lose strength by fighting against the waves
instead of working with them. Learning to flow with the waves is key.

4. MENTAL PREPARATION: THINK YOUR WAY THROUGH

In addition to physical readiness, mental preparation plays a paramount role in open-water swimming. It is often easier to achieve physical fitness than mental fortitude. Building psychological resilience requires time and experience. You must learn to overcome crises and effectively manage any fears that may arise during swimming. Setting smaller goals throughout your swim can help you tackle challenges and maintain focus.

5. NAVIGATING THE DARK: SWIMMING IN LOW LIGHT

In certain instances, long-distance swims may require navigating in darkness. Swimming in the dark presents unique psychological hurdles to overcome. Fear of the unknown and limited visibility make this challenge, particularly demanding. Prioritize safety when swimming at night by ensuring appropriate equipment, such as signal lights, and having a
support team. Similar to swimming in deep water, start in a familiar and safe area, gradually increasing the duration of your swims as you gain confidence and skill.

By following these expert tips, you can develop the necessary skills and mindset to conquer
challenges in open-water swimming. Embrace the water, hone your technique, and push the boundaries of your abilities.